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Abhayadatta


The author of "The Lives of the 84 Mahasiddhas." Three translations of this text are:
Masters of Mahamudra
Buddhist Masters of Enchantment
Buddha's Lions, The Lives of The Eighty - Four Siddhas
Abheda


One of the sixteen Arhats.
He holds a bodhi stupa (byang chub mchod rten) in his hands.
Ajantajaya
Ajantajaya


He is the 24th of the 25  Kulika Kings of Shambhala, in the Kalachakra tradtion. In his left hand he holds a vajra and in his right hand a bell.
Ajatashatru
Ajatashatru


King of Magadha and son of king of Bimbisara. Later in his life he became a Buddhist.
Ajitasena
Ajitasena


One of the teachers the young Buddha Shakyamuni met in his search for enlightenment.
Ajnata Kaundinya
Ajnata Kaundinya


One of the five ascetics who became the first disciples of Buddha Shakyamuni. In the Lotus Sutra, chapter eight, it is predicted that he will become a Buddha called Universal Brightness.
Ananda
Ananda


One of the ten major disciples of Buddha Shakyamuni, and his personal attendant and received more teachings than any other disciple. He was a cousin of the Buddha and Devadatta was his brother. Ananda was known for his excellent memory. He recited the collection of sutra teachings at the first council held in Rajagriha. He attained enlightenment under the guidance of Mahakashyapa.
Ananyagamin
Ananyagamin


He was the 29th of the 53 teachers the young Shakyamuni Buddha met on his way to enlightenment.
Aniruddha
Aniruddha


A cousin of the Buddha, and one of the ten foremost disciples of Buddha Shakyamuni.
One of the sixteen Shravakas.
Also the name of one of the 25 Kulika kings of Shambhala.
Anuruddha
Anuruddha


A  cousin of  and one of the ten foremost disciples of Shakyamuni Buddha. He was known for his divine insight.
Apalala nagaraja
Apalala nagaraja


Commonly know as Varuna, the king of nagas. He plays a role in weather making rituals. Different representations of him are known.
Arada Kalama
Arada Kalama


A hermit sage under whom Budddha Shakyamuni studied.
Asanga
Asanga


Asanga lived in India during the fourth century CE and established the Yogachara school with his younger brother, Vasubandhu. he was born in a kausika brahmana family of Purushapuran (Peshawar). After twelve years of retreat, he received a vision of Maitreya and subsequently wrote the five Maitreya texts, which have had a profound impact on mahayana Buddhism.

Five texts by Asanga, revealed to him by Maitreya:
1. Ornament for Clear Realization, mngon par rtogs pa'i rgyan, abhisamayalankara
2. Ornament for the Mahayana Sutras, theg pa chen po'i mdo sde'i rgyan, mahayanasutralankara
3.Sublime Continuum of the Mahayana, theg pa chen po rgyud bla ma'i bstan, mahayanottaratantrashastra, ratnagotravibhaga
4. Distinguishing Phenomena and Pure Being (Nature of Phenomena), chos dang chos nyid rnam par 'byed pa, dharmadharmatavibhanga
5. Distinguishing the Middle and the Extremes, dbus dang mtha' rnam par 'byed pa, madhyantavibhanga.
These texts are know as the "Five Treasises of Maitreya." (byams chos sde lnga)
Asha
Asha


The 8th of the 52 teachers the young Buddha Shakyamuni met on his quest to enlightenment. She  was the first female teacher. She resides in the Forest of Universal Splendor, and was queen of king Suprabha.
Ashoka
Ashoka


King of India from 273-236 BC.
Ashokashri
Ashokashri


One of the Thirty-five Buddhas of confession. He is dressed in monk robes (chos gos). His hands are in dharmachakra mudra (teaching mudra) and he is seated in varjasana or dhyanasana. His head is surrounded by a nimbus (dbu’i ‘od ‘khor) adorned with seven serpents, his hair is in tight curls with a topknot (ushnisha) He rests on a lotus seat (padmasana).

Different representation: Same as above with the exceptions that he is holding the stem of an Ashoka tree in both hands and his hands are not in dharmachakra mudra.
Ashvagosha
Ashvagosha


He lived in the second century at the time of King Kanishka. He was a native of Shravasti (Middle India). At first he criticized Buddhism, but was later refuted by Parshva and became a buddhist. His most famous work is the Buddhacarita, the life story of Buddha Shakyamuni in prose. Other works by him:
Fifty Verses on Guru Devotion, bla ma lnga bcu pa
Mahayana sutralamkara shastra
Saundarananda kavya
Shariputra prakarana (a drama).
Ashvajit
Ashvajit


One of the five ascetics who became the first disciples of Buddha Shakyamuni.
Asita
Asita


He prophesied that if Shakyamuni stayed home he would become a great chakravartin (wordly king), and if he would leave he would become a buddha.
Atisha
Atisha


Atisha Dipamkara Shrijnana (982–1055 CE) was a renowned Buddhist scholar and teacher at the monastic university, Vikramashila, in India. He was born in a royal family in Bengal. He was invited to Tibet in 1043 (1042?) by the Kings Yeshe O (ye she 'od) and Jang Chub O (byang chub 'od), where he founded the kadampa school and wrote his most influential work, The Lamp for the Path to Enlightenment (Bodhipathapradipa), which teaches the gradual path to enlightenment. He introduced the cult of Tara, who was his tutelary deity (yidam), in Tibet. He is also known by the name of Jowo Je. His main disciple was Drom Tonpa ('drom ston pa). Another chief disciple was the translator Ngog Legpa Sherab (sngog legs pa'i shes rab). He died at Nyethang (nye thang)
Bakula
Bakula


One of the sixteen or eighteen Arhats. He led a solitary life in Uttakura, without any disciples. He symbolizes freedom from spiritual poverty.
He is depicted with a mongoose, holding with both hands.
Bhaddiya
Bhaddiya


Cousin of Buddha Shakyamuni.
Bhadra
Bhadra


One of the eighteen arhats, a cousin of Buddha Shakyamuni
Bhadra
Bhadra


Disciple of the Buddha and wife of Maha Kashyapa.
Bhadrapada
Bhadrapada


One of the 84 Mahasiddhas, according to text by Abhayadatta.
He was a rich brahman who once prevented a yogi who was carrying a skull cup from entering his premises to beg for alms. The brahman considered the yogi an unclean person. The yogi answered: "Unclean are those whose mind, body, and speech are morally corrupt. Seek the immaculate purity of those whose sins have been purified by the teachings of the great gurus." Hearing this the brahman could not help coming to the cementery with offerings of wine and meat to recieve the yogi's teachings. After six years of meditation he attained supreme siddhi.
Bhadrika
Bhadrika


One of the five ascetics who became the first disciples of Buddha Shakyamuni.
Bhavaviveka or Bhavya
Bhavaviveka or Bhavya


Bhavaviveka (500-578) was born in a ksatriya family in south India. He studied with Sangharakshita the Mahayana sutras and texts by Nagarjuna. He is the founder of the Svatantrika Madhyamika and refuted the view held by Buddhapalita.
Texts by Bhavaviveka:
Prajna Pradipa Mulamadhyamaka vritti, dbu ma rtsa ba'i 'grel pa shes rab sgron ma, Wisdom Lamp
Madhyamaka ratna pradipa Madhyamaka hridaya vritti Tarka jvala
Madhyamakartha sangraha, dbu ma'i don dsdus pa
Pradipoddyotana vishamapada panjika nama, sgron ma gsal bar byed dka' ba btus pa'i 'grel pa shes bya ba
Bodhibhadra
Bodhibhadra


One of Atisa's teachers at the Nalanda University
Bodhisattva Devaputra Svetaketu


During the time of Buddha Kshyapa, Buddha Shakyamuni was born as the Brahmin Kye'u Lama (khye'u bla ma).
After the passing of Kye'u Lama, he was born in Tushita as the Bodhisattva Devaputra Svetaketu (dam pa tok dkar po).
Buddha Shakyamuni
Buddha Shakyamuni


Sage of the Shakyas. The historical buddha was born as prince Siddartha Gautama into the Sakya clan in the fifth century BCE. Upon attaining enlightenment at Bodhgaya, Buddha Shakyamuni taught the Dharma. He is the fourth of the thousand buddhas of the present era.
Buton Rinchen Drup
Buton Rinchen Drup


(1290-1364) Also known as Buton Rinpoche or Lord of Zhalu. His most famous work is "The Jewelry of Scripture, The History of Buddhism in India and Tibet."
This work is translated into Englsh by Obermiller.
Chandaka
Chandaka


A servant of Buddha Shakyamuni, he led the horse on which Buddha Shakyamuni left his father's palace.
Chen Ngawa
Chen Ngawa


One of the "three brothers," spiritual sons of Kadampa master Dromtonpa.
Chogyal Phagpa Lodro Gyaltshen
Chogyal Phagpa Lodro Gyaltshen


(1235-1280) Nephew of Sakya Pandita and his successor. He became the spiritual adviser to khubilai Khan, who gave him the tilte of guoshi and the regency of Tibet in the Mongol empire's name. Phagpa Lodro Gyaltshen is credited with the developmaent of the first Mongol script which he adapted from the Tibetan. He is the Fifth of the Five Early Patriachs of the Sakya.
Books related:
Luminous Lives
Chokro Luyi Gyaltsen
Chokro Luyi Gyaltsen


A great translator (Sanskrit to Tibetan) at Samye during the reign of King Trisong Detsen. He worked together with other great translators Vairochana and Kawa Paltsek and others. Along with Kawa Paltseg he was sent to Kashmir to invite the great scholar Vimalamitra to Tibet. The Terton Karma Lingpa is considered an emanation of Chokro Luyi Gyaltsen.
Chokyi Wangchuk
Chokyi Wangchuk


Chokyi Wangchuk (1584-1635, the Sixth Shamar Rinpoche, was recognized at an early age by his principle guru , the Ninth Gyalwang Karmapa Wangchuk Dorje. Demonstrating swift accomplishment in his training and tremendous proficiency in debate and scholarschip, he became one of the most renowned panditas of his era. He traveled and taught extensively throughout Tibet, China, and Nepal, and performed  vast activity for the benefit of beings. He is also Karma Chakme Rinpoche's guru. Just as the Golden Garland of the Kagyu succession continued with Chokyi Wangchuk himself, he in turn recognized the tenth reincarnation of the Gyalwang Karmapa, Choying Dorje.
Marpa
Dakmema


Wife of Marpa, she played a prominent role in the life story of Milarepa.
Dalai Lama, 13th
Dalai Lama, 13th


(1876-1933)
Dalai Lama, Fifth
Dalai Lama, Fifth


(1617-1682) He was installed in Gushri Khan in1642 as the Fifth Dalai Lama. He reunified Tibet during his reign and enforced many changes. The political victory of the Gelukpa changed its destiny and it was the Fifth Dalai Lama who made Lhasa into the centre of the Tibetan world, with an influence reaching into Mongolia and Ladakh. He started the construction of the Potala in Lhasa. His death was kept a secret for over a decade to allow the Potala to be finished.

Books related to the Fifth Dalai Lama:
Pluvial Nectar of Blessings, A Supplication to the Noble Lama Mahaguru Padmasambhava.
Secret Visions of the Fifth Dalai Lama
Fourteen Dalai Lamas: A Sacred Legacy of Reincarnation
Dharmarakshita
Dharmarakshita


Indian yogi, and teacher of Atisha. He composed the important Mahayna text "The Wheel of Sharp Weapons."
Dorje Dze Od
Dorje Dze Od


(13th century) He was a disciple of Paldan Ritro Wang Chuk (dpal ldan ri khrod dbang phyug)    
and who was a disciple of Jigten Gonpo ('jig rten mgon po), the founder of the Drikung Kagyu ('bri gung).  Dorje Dze Od wrote also a Tilopa biography (rje te lo pa'i rnam thar). One finds this translation in the book "Great Kagyu Masters).
Drigomrepa


A disciple of Milarepa
Drokmi Lotsawa ('brog mi lotsawa shakya ye shes), the Translator


(ca. 992/993-1043/1072) Marpa studied for fifteen years Sanskrit and other subjects under the guidance of Drokmi Lotsawa.
Dromtonpa
Dromtonpa


(1004-1064) His full name is: Dromton Gyalway Jungne ('brom ston rgyal ba'i 'byung gnas). A disciple of Atisha. Together with Atisha he translated the "Wheel of Sharp Weapons" by Dharmarakshita from Sanskrit into Tibetan.
Drup Thop Orgyenpa Rinchen Pal
Drup Thop Orgyenpa Rinchen Pal


(1229/30-1309).  He was a disciple of Gotshangpa (rgod tshang pa) and wrote a biography of Tilopa (Te lo pa'i rnam thar).
Dusum Khyenpa
Dusum Khyenpa


The first Karmapa [1110-1193], he was a student of Gampopa and received Kalachakra teachings and the lam dre teachings from Virupa. See also karma kagyu, and Karmapa.

Five First Disciples of Buddha Shakyamuni
Five First Disciples of Buddha Shakyamuni


The five ascetics who practiced with Buddha Shakyamuni. They left him when the Buddha gave up the practice of ascetism. Later after the Buddha's enlightenment they became his first disciples.
Their names are:
Ajnata Kaundinya
Ashvajit
Bhadrika
Mahanama
Vashpa
Four Great Pillars


These are the four main disciples of Marpa: Milarepa (Mi la ras pa), Nog chodor (rNog chos kyi rdo rje), Tshur wang nge ('Tshur dbang nge) and Metsonpo (Mes tshon po).
Gampopa
Gampopa


Gampopa (1079-1153), also known as Dakpo Rinpoche, was born Sonam Rinchen in Nyal, Central Tibet.  He is best known for combining the Kadampa tradition with the Mahamudra and tantric teachings of Milarepa, and for his famous book, The Jewel Ornament of Liberation. Gampopa previously lived as a Bodhisattva renowned for herbal healing abilities during the time of Shakyamuni Buddha, who predicted this rebirth. For the first part of his life, Gampopa lived as a householder and became an accomplished physician. Upon the death of his wife and children from an epidemic, his mind turned wholly toward Dharma and he was ordained and practiced in the Kadampa order. The first time he heard the name, “Milarepa,” Gampopa knew this to be the name of his Guru and immediately sought him out. Though he had to go through many hardships of practice under Milarepa, Gampopa early on showed signs of his high ability and destiny and advanced very quickly. After years of practice, Milarepa acknowledged the excellence and vastness of Gampopa’s realization. Milarepa sent him to the east to a mountain area called Gampo Trashi Rewo where Gampopa attracted thousands of students. Four of his disciples in particular stood out and came to spread what is now known as the “Four Great” schools of the Kagyupa. Among these four students was Dusum Khyenpa, the First Karmapa.
Geshe Potowa
Geshe Potowa


One of the "three brothers," spiritual sons of Kadampa master Dromtonpa.
Gunaprabha


Indian scholar, born into a Brahman family in Mathura. He studied the under Vasubandu the Buddhist sutra, vinaya and commentaries. His speciality was monastic code of the Sarvastivadins. His Vinaya sutra is still used by the Tibetansfor the study of monastic code of discipline.
He is one of the "Two Supreme Ones" (mchog gnyis). who are part of the "Eight Ornaments (Adornments)" (rgyan drug).
Gyal Thang pa Dechen Dorje
Gyal Thang pa Dechen Dorje


(13th. century). He was a student of Gotsangpa (rgod tshang pa)  and wrote a Tilopa's biography (rje btsun chen po Tilli pa'i rnam par thar pa) and a Gotshangpa's biography.
Hashang
Hashang


A Chinese meditation teacher whose view was repudiated by Kamalashila.
Jatson Nyingpo


(1585-1656) A treasure revealer. One of the revealed text is the "Kon Chog Chi Du" (dkon mchog spyi dus).
Kamalashila
Kamalashila


An Indian pandit, follower of the Yogacaya Madhyamaka school. He was invited to Tibet by King Tri Song Deu Tsan and defeated the Chinese monk Hashang Mahayana in a debate. His most famous work is the Bhavanakrama, sgom rim, Stages of Mediation.
Karma Pakshi
Karma Pakshi


The second Karmapa
Karma Rangjung Dorje


The author of a collection of "jataka" or former birth stories of Buddha Shakyamuni.
He added another 65 stories to Aryashura's Jatakamala, making a total of 100 stories.
Karmapa
Karmapa


The Gyalwa Karmapa, is the head of the Karma Kagyu lineage of Tibetan Buddhism. The present Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, is the seventeenth in an unbroken lineage that began with dusum khyenpa (1110-1193).The Gyalwa Karmapas, who embody the activity of buddhahood, were prophesied by both Buddha Shakyamuni and Padmasambhava. A manifestation of Chenrezik, they are pure examples of wisdom and compassion, and have revealed their realization as scholars, yogins, artists, and poets. See also kagyu, karma kagyu, and dusum khyenpa.
Karmapa 10th, Choying Dorje


(1604-1674)
Karmapa 11th, Yeshe Dorje


(1675-1702)
Karmapa 12th, Jangchub Dorje


(1703-1732)
Karmapa 13th, Dudul Dorje


(1733-1797)
Karmapa 14th, Thekchok Dorje


(1797-1845)
Karmapa 15th, Khakhyab Dorje


(1845-1924)
Karmapa 16th, Rangjung Rigpe Dorje


(1924-1981)
Karmapa 1st, Dusum Khyenpa


(1110-1193)
Karmapa 2nd, Karma Pakshi


(1206-1283)
Karmapa 3rd, Rangjung Dorje


(1284-1339)
Karmapa 4th, Rolpay Dorje


(1340-1383)
Karmapa 5th, Dezhin Shekpa


(1384-1415)
Karmapa 6th, Tongwa Dondam


(1416-1453)
Karmapa 7th, Chodrak Gyamtso


(1454-1506)
Karmapa 8th, Mikyo Dorje


(1507-1554)
Karmapa 9th, Wangchuk Dorje


(1556-1603)
Karme Chakme
Karme Chakme


Sanskrit for Karma Chakme.
Kashyapa Buddha
Kashyapa Buddha


The buddha who lived before the present Shakyamuni Buddha. The third buddha of our present era.
Kawa Paltsek
Kawa Paltsek


A translator, he translated numerous texts from Sanskrit into Tibetan at Samye during the reign of King Trisong Detsen, and became the principal translator at Samye. He was a disciple of Padmasambhava and Shantarakshita. He was one of the first seven people ordained by Shantarakshita. He also helped reinstate Vairochana, after Vairocana was exiled to Tshaba Rong. Vairocana was accused of having received impure teachings from India.

He is the author of
1. "Manual of Key Buddhist Terms, Categorization of Buddhist Terminology with Commentary." (lo tsa ba ka ba dpal brtsegs kyis mdzed pa'i chos kyi rnam grangs dang, chos kyi rnam grangs kyi brjed byang bzhuks so)
2. Seventeenfold Appearance of the Sequence of the View, lta rim snang ba bcu bdun pa
Kharchungrepa


A disciple of Milarepa
Konchok Gyalpo
Konchok Gyalpo


(1034-1102) Founder of the Sakya school, one of the four major schools of Tibetan Buddhism.
Kumarajiva
Kumarajiva


A great translator from Kotan. He was proficient in Tibetan as well Chinese. He translated several Prajnaparamita Sutras, Stainless Wisdom Sutra, White Lotus Sutra and the Fundamental Middle Way by Nagarjuna and Four Hundred Verses by Aryadeva.
Kunzang Palden (Khenpo Kunpal)
Kunzang Palden (Khenpo Kunpal)


(1870-1940) A Nyingma master from eastern Tibet, he was a disciple both of Patrul Rinpoche and Mipham Rinpoche. Also known by the name of Khenpo Kunpel. His most famous text is a commentary on Shantideva's Bodhicharyavatara. ( byang chub sems dpa'i spyod pa la 'jug pa'i tshig 'grel 'jam dbyangs bla ma'i zhal lung bdud rtsi'i thig pa) (The Nectar of Manjushri's Speech, A Commentary on the Bodhicharyavatara) A translation of the ninth chapter (on wisdom) can be found in the book "Wisdom Two Buddhist Commentaries."
Kye'u Lama


During the time of Buddha Kshyapa Buddha Shakyamuni was born as the Brahmin Kye'u Lama (khye'u bla ma). At the time Buddha Kashyapa ordained Kye'u Lama, he prophesied that when the lifespan of humans living in this world would become one hundred years, Kye'u Lama would be reborn as the one called "Buddha shakyamuni."
After the passing of Kye'u Lama, he was born in Tushita as the Bodhisattva Devaputra Svetaketu (dam pa tok dkar po).
Atisha
Langri Thangpa


(1054-1123) A prominent monk of the Kadampa school. He was so called because he founded the Langri Thangpa monastery, situated to the northeast of Lhasa. He is the author of the famous Kadampa text: "Eight Verses for Training the Mind (blo sbyong tshigs brgyad ma).
Laughing Vajra
Laughing Vajra


An epithet for Milarepa
Lingrepa


A master belonging to the Drugpa school.
Loden Sherap
Loden Sherap


A disciple of Atisha.
Lodro Rinchen Senge


Founder of the  Chepa college (byes grva tshang) at the Gelugpa Sera Monastery. He had Hayagriva as his tutelary deity.
Longchen Rabjam
Longchen Rabjam


(1308-1363) Or Kun mKhyen kLong Chen, the omniscient Longchen. A Nyingma master and visionary. His most famous treatises are: Seven Treatises (klong chen mdzod bdun), Triple Relaxation (ngal gso skor gsum) and the Triple Self Liberation (rang grol skor gsum).
Marpa
Marpa, Marpa Lotsawa, Marpa the Translator


(1012 - 1097 C.E.) Marpa was born in Lhodak (Lho brag), Southern Tibet, and from an early age was known for his remarkable strength and power. Considered to be the reicarnation of Dombi Heruka, an Indian mahasiddha. He studied under Drokmi Lotsawa ('brog mi lotsawa shakya ye shes), the Translator for fifteen years, and became a master not only in the Tibetan language but in Sanskrit as well. Marpa decided to seek out teachings then unavailable in Tibet and while in Nepal he heard of the Master Naropa living in India, whose root Guru was Tilopa, the founder of the Kagyu lineage. At that time, travel to India was full of hardship and danger. Despite great expense and hazards, Marpa made three trips to India and brought back many tantric teachings, including the Six Yogas of Naropa, the Guhyasamaja, and the Chakrasamvara practices. Marpa's amazing accomplishment lies not only in the dangers and difficulties undertaken to receive and bring back the teachings, but also in the fact that he went through the great hardship of the practices, as well. He thus was able to communicate in his translation not just the words but also the experience and realization of the teachings, and genuinely make this available to others. In this manner, as a married Lama, father, and householder, Marpa studied, worked, traveled, translated, and practiced for over forty years. He thus initiated and founded the Kagyu lineage in Tibet, and is also known as the main teacher of Milarepa. Marpa wrote a biography of Tilopa: Life of Mahasiddha Tilopa.
Milarepa
Milarepa


This famous yogi (1040–-1143) is one of the greatest and most celebrated teachers in Tibetan Buddhism. Despite having accumulated heavy negative karma in his early adulthood, he became the student of Marpa and attained full awakening in one lifetime. He then composed the 100,000 Songs, spontaneously created to elucidate his experience of realization. His students include Gampopa and Rechungpa.

Go to books about and by Milarepa
Montsepa Kunga Palden
Montsepa Kunga Palden


(1408-1475?) He wrote a Tilopa's biography (ti lo shes rab bzng po'i rnam thar)
Nagarjuna


A leading Buddhist philosopher in the interpretation of shunyata, the founder of the Madhyamaka school, and the author of The Fundamental Treatise of the Middle Way. Lived in India in the late second century CE.
Naropa
Naropa


The great Indian Pandita and mahasiddha (956-1050 or 1012-1100), who underwent severe austerities under his guru Tilopa and later achieved the state of Vajradhara. His principal disciple was Marpa, See also Six Dharmas of Naropa.
Ngog Legpe Sherap
Ngog Legpe Sherap


A disciple of Atisha,and who built Sangphu (gsang phu sne thong) Monastery in central Tibet.
Padampa Sangye


Indian Tantic master who founded the Zhiche (zhi byed) school. This school has completely disappeared, though the practice of Cho (gcod), initiated by Machig Lapdron (ma cig lab sgron ma) has survived in the other lineages.
Padmasambhava
Padmasambhava


Literally, the "lotus-born" buddha of Uddiyana who brought the vajrayana teachings to Tibet in the ninth century CE. He subdued the negative forces of Tibet, founded the Nyingma school, and concealed Dharmic treasures (terma) for the benefit of future generations. When the time is ripe, these teachings are discovered by tertons who properly reveal them to others. Padmasambhava's pure land is called "Copper Coloured Mountain."
Phuchungwa
Phuchungwa


One of the "three brothers," spiritual sons of Kadampa master Dromtonpa.
Rangjung Dorje
Rangjung Dorje


The Third Karmapa (1284-–1339), renowned for his texts used extensively in the Kagyu lineage, among which are The Aspiration Prayer of Mahamudra of Definitive Meaning, The Profound Inner Meaning, and Treatise on Buddha Essence.
Rendawa
Rendawa


(1349-1412) A famous Sakya master. His birth place was Renda Khangso, near Sakya, and he was born into the lineage of the famous minister Gar, his father's name was Tashi Gyaltsen (bkra shis rgyal mtsan) and his mother was Wangchuk Kyi (dbang phyug skyid). As a child he was called Dzunne, his parents died while he was still young. He was raised by the nun Tashi Bum (bkra shis 'bum). From the teacher Pakchen Chozangpal ('phags chen chos bzang dpal) he received the refuge , bodhisattva and upasaka vows. He took the novice monk vows (shramanera, dge tsul) from Sazang Panchen (sa bzang pan chen) and received the name Zhonnu Lodro. He studied logic, madhyamika, abhidharma and other treatises as well tresatises on tantra. Tsongkhapa received Madhyamika teachings from him.

For more info see Nagarjuna's Letter with a Commentary by Rendawa
Repazhiwa'o


A disciple of Milarepa